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Thursday, September 27, 2012

Indonesia Seeks to Buy 8 AH-64D Attack Helicopters


Deal to include various equipment and 140 Hellfire missiles.

DSCA Announces Possible $1.42Bn Sale of Apache Block III Helicopters

WASHINGTON | The Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) notified U.S. Congress September 19 of a possible Foreign Military Sale (FMS) to the Government of Indonesia of 8 AH-64D APACHE Block III LONGBOW Attack Helicopters and associated equipment, parts, training and logistical support. The estimated cost is $1.42 billion. 

The Government of Indonesia has requested a possible sale of 8 AH-64D APACHE Block III LONGBOW Attack Helicopters, 19 T-700-GE-701D Engines (16 installed and 3 spares), 9 Modernized Target Acquisition and Designation Sight/Modernized Pilot Night Vision Sensors, 4 AN/APG-78 Fire Control Radars (FCR) with Radar Electronics Units (Longbow Component), 4 AN/APR-48A Radar Frequency Interferometers, 10 AAR- 57(V) 3/5 Common Missile Warning Systems (CMWS) with 5th Sensor and Improved Countermeasure Dispenser, 10 AN/AVR-2B Laser Detecting Sets, 10 AN/APR-39A(V)4 Radar Signal Detecting Sets, 24 Integrated Helmet and Display Sight Systems (IHDSS-21), 32 M299A1 HELLFIRE Missile Launchers, and 140 HELLFIRE AGM-114R3 Missiles. 

Also included are Identification Friend or Foe transponders, 30mm guns and ammunition, communication equipment, tools and test equipment, training devices, simulators, generators, transportation, wheeled vehicles, organizational equipment, spare and repair parts, support equipment, personnel training and training equipment, U.S. government and contractor engineering, technical, and logistics support services, and other related elements of logistics support. The estimated cost is $1.42 billion. 

This proposed sale will contribute to the foreign policy and national security of the United States by helping to improve the security of a friendly country which has been, and continues to be, an important force for political stability and economic progress in Southeast Asia. 

The proposed sale provides the Government of Indonesia with assets vital to protect and deter both external and other potential threats. Indonesia will use these APACHE helicopters to defend its borders, conduct counterterrorism and counter-piracy operations, and control the free flow of shipping through the Strait of Malacca. 

The materiel and services under this program will enable Indonesia to become a more capable defensive force and will also provide key elements required for interoperability with U.S. forces. 

The proposed sale of this equipment and support will not alter the basic military balance in the region. 

The prime contractors will be The Boeing Company in Mesa, Arizona; Lockheed Martin Corporation in Orlando, Florida; General Electric Company in Cincinnati, Ohio; Lockheed Martin Millimeter Technology in Owego, New York; and Longbow Limited Liability Corporation in Orlando, Florida. 

Implementation of this proposed sale may require the assignment of five U.S. contractor representatives and three U.S. Government representatives in country full-time for equipment checkout, fielding, and technical support. 

There will be no adverse impact on U.S. defense readiness as a result of this proposed sale. 

This notice of a potential sale is required by law and does not mean the sale has been concluded. 

South Korea Interested in Procurement of AH-1Z and AH-64D Helicopters


An AH-1Z during weapons testing at NAVAIR Warfare Center Weapons Division in China Lake. (Photo: U.S. Navy)

DSCA Announces Two Requests for Attack Helicopters Valued at $2.6 Billion and $3.6 Billion

WASHINGTON | The Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) notified U.S. Congress September 21 of a possible Foreign Military Sale (FMS) to the Government of Korea for 36 AH-1Z COBRA Attack Helicopters and associated equipment, parts, training and logistical support for an estimated cost of $2.6 billion. 

The Government of the Republic of Korea has requested a possible sale of 36 AH-1Z COBRA Attack Helicopters, 84 T-700 GE 401C Engines (72 installed and 12 spares), 288 AGM-114K3 HELLFIRE Missiles, 72 AIM-9M-8 SIDEWINDER Missiles, integrated missile launchers, AN/AAQ-30 Target Sighting Systems (TSS) and AN/ALQ-136 Radar Frequency Jammers. The electronic warfare systems include the AN/AAR-47 Missile Warning System, AN/ALQ-144 Infrared Jammer, APX-123 Identify Friend or Foe (IFF) Mode-4 and AN/ALE-47 Chaff and Flare Decoy Dispenser, communication and support equipment, spare engine containers spare and repair parts, tools and test equipment, technical data and publications, personnel training and training equipment, U.S. government and contractor engineering, technical and logistics support services, and other related elements of logistics and program support. The estimated cost is $2.6 billion. 

The Government of Korea is one of the major political and economic powers in East Asia and the Western Pacific and a key partner of the United States in ensuring peace and stability in that region. It is vital to the U.S. national interest to assist our Korean ally in developing and maintaining a strong and ready self-defense capability. 

The proposed sale of the AH-1Z COBRA helicopters will improve South Korea’s capability to meet current and future threats. The sale of these AH-1Z helicopters will improve its close air support, air interdiction, armed reconnaissance, strike coordination/reconnaissance, forward air control (airborne), and aerial escort capabilities while enhancing interoperability with U.S. forces. Korea will have no difficulty absorbing these helicopters into its armed forces. 

The proposed sale of this system and support will not alter the basic military balance in the region. 

The prime contractors will be Bell-Textron Corporation in Amarillo, Texas, and General Electric in Lynn, Massachusetts. There are no known offset agreements proposed in connection with this potential sale. 

Implementation of this proposed sale will require multiple trips to Korea involving U.S. Government or contractor representatives on a temporary basis for program and technical ort, and management oversight. 

There will be no adverse impact on U.S. defense readiness as a result of this proposed sale. 

This notice of a potential sale is required by law and does not mean the sale has been concluded. 

AH-64D APACHE ATTACK HELICOPTERS 

Further, the DSCA notified Congress September 21 of a possible FMS to the Government of Korea for 36 AH-64D APACHE Longbow Block III Attack Helicopters and associated equipment, parts, training and logistical support for an estimated cost of $3.6 billion. 

The Republic of Korea has requested a possible sale of: 
• 36 AH-64 D APACHE Longbow Block III Attack Helicopters 
• 84 T-700-GE-701D Engines (72 installed and 12 spares) 
• 42 Modernized Target Acquisition and Designation Sight/Modernized Pilot Night Vision Sensors 
• 36 AN/APG-78 Fire Control Radar (FCR) with Radar Electronics Unit (Longbow Component) 
• 36 AN/APR-48A Radar Frequency Interferometers 
• 42 AN/APR-39 Radar Signal Detecting Sets 
• 45 AN/AVR-2B Laser Warning Sets 
• 43 AAR-57(V) 3/5 Common Missile Warning Systems (CMWS) with 5th Sensor and Improved Countermeasure Dispensers 
• 42 AN/APX-123 Transponders 
• 120 Improved Helmet Display Sight Systems (IHDSS-21) 
• 81 Embedded Global Positioning Systems with Inertial Navigation 
• 38 30mm Automatic Chain Guns (Aircraft Component) 
• 90 AN/ARC-201E Single Channel Ground and Airborne Radio System (SINCGARS) Radios 
• 90 AN/ARC-231 Radios 
• 42 AN/ARC-220 Radios 
• 80 M299 HELLFIRE or Missile Launchers 
• 400 AGM-114R1 HELLFIRE Missiles Semi-Active Lasers (SAL) 
• 438 STINGER Block I 92H Missiles 
• 774,144 30 mm Cartridge HEDP High Explosive Dual Purpose M789s 
• 11,020 2.75 Inch HYDRA Rockets (Unguided) 
• 108 APACHE Aviator Integrated Helmets (AAIH) 

Also included are training devices, simulators, generators, transportation, wheeled vehicles and organizational equipment, tools and test equipment, communication equipment, spare and repair parts, support equipment, personnel training and training equipment, publications and technical documentation, U.S. Government and contractor engineering, technical and logistics support services, and other related elements of program support. The estimated cost is $3.6 billion. 

The ROK is one of the major political and economic powers in East Asia and the Western Pacific and a key partner of the United States in ensuring peace and stability in that region. It is vital to the U.S. national interest to assist our Korean ally in developing and maintaining a strong and ready self-defense capability. 

The ROK intends to use new attack helicopters to more effectively secure its borders and littoral waters, as well as conduct counter-terrorism/counter-piracy operations. The proposed sale will improve the Republic of Korea Army’s close air support, air interdiction, armed reconnaissance, strike coordination/reconnaissance, forward air control (airborne), and aerial escort capabilities while enhancing interoperability with U.S. forces. Korea will have no difficulty absorbing these helicopters into its armed forces. 

The proposed sale of this equipment and support will not alter the basic military balance in the region. 

The prime contractors will be The Boeing Company in Mesa, Arizona; Lockheed Martin Corporation in Orlando, Florida; General Electric Company in Cincinnati, Ohio; Lockheed Martin Millimeter Technology in Owego, New York; and Longbow Limited Liability Corporation in Orlando, Florida. There are no known offset agreements proposed in connection with this potential sale. 
Implementation of this proposed sale may require the assignment of additional U.S. contractor and U.S. Government representatives in country full-time. Contractor Field Service Representatives will be in country for post production support for an estimated three years with anticipation of a future follow on support contract or an additional Foreign Military Sales contract for support. Also, U.S. Government representatives will include a U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Life Cycle Management Command (AMCOM) field office for technical and logistical support for three years. 

There will be no adverse impact on U.S. defense readiness as a result of this proposed sale. 

This notice of a potential sale is required by law and does not mean the sale has been concluded. 

Saturday, September 22, 2012

Advanced Precision Kill Weapon System to be Integrated on UAS


Fire Scouts soon to be armed with APKWS precision-guided rockets

NASHUA, N.H. | For the first time, the Advanced Precision Kill Weapon System (APKWS) will be integrated onto an unmanned aerial vehicle, BAE Systems announced Sept. 17. The company, which designed and manufactures the guidance section of the laser-guided rocket, was recently awarded a U.S. Navy contract to add the APKWS onto the MQ-8B Fire Scout UAV.

“APKWS’ precision firepower will soon be available on a UAV platform,” said Roy Rumbaugh, APKWS program manager at BAE Systems. “With BAE Systems’ innovative technologies, the Fire Scout will engage targets on land or at sea with laser-guided accuracy while keeping our warfighters out of harm’s way.” 

The system is being integrated onto the Fire Scout in response to an urgent operational need and is being prepared for rapid deployment. BAE Systems will support this rapid APKWS integration by performing system analyses and modeling based on its high fidelity, integrated flight simulator. 

"This expansion onto unmanned aircraft is the next exciting step after demonstrating performance on both rotary and fixed-wing manned aircraft," Rumbaugh said. 

Unmanned aircraft can operate in regimes that are considered too hazardous for manned aircraft and dramatically expand the types of missions that can be conducted from surface ships. 

The APKWS is the U.S. government's only program of record for the semi- active laser-guided 2.75-inch rocket. U.S. Marine aviators recently completed the initial operational test and evaluation phase of the APKWS program, firing successfully against stationary and moving targets from AH-1W and UH-1Y helicopters. The APKWS system has since been deployed in Afghanistan and the company continues to ship units to theater for use against insurgent forces. 

BAE Systems has been the APKWS prime contractor since 2006. The company is partnered with the Direct and Time Sensitive Strike Program Office at the U.S. Naval Air Systems Command for the development, integration, and delivery of the APKWS. 

(Photo: BAE Systems)

Read more athttp://www.defpro.com/

First Flight of Belgian NH90 Tactical Transport Helicopter


(Photo: NHIndustries)

NHIndustries (NHI) is proud to announce the first flight of the first NH90 Tactical Transport Helicopter ordered by the Belgian armed forces. For this first flight, performed on Sept 18th from Marignane, the crew tested all the main systems of this new-generation aircraft such as the engines and the flight controls. After landing, the crew expressed its satisfaction with the behaviour of the helicopter. The Belgian armed forces ordered eight NH90s, four TTHs for tactical transport operations and four NFHs for naval operations. 

The Belgian NH90 TTH is a Full Operational Capability standard helicopter. This aircraft is very close to the French NH90 Caiman TTH for which deliveries started in the end of 2011 in Full Operational Capability Standard. This commonality brings to the Belgian customer all the return of experience collected during the development of the French NH90 TTH. 

“This first flight is an important milestone for NHI since it marks the arrival of a new comer in the NH90 users community, we are all impressed by the degree of maturity demonstrated by this helicopter” declared Xavier Poupardin, delegated managing director of NHI. 

The NH90 TTH (Tactical Transport Helicopter) variant is a helicopter of 11 ton class primarily configured to perform tactical transport missions in all environments by day and night. The NH90TTH flexibility allows its users to perform additional missions such as internal/external load transport, Heliborne Operations, Special Operations, Search and Rescue, Casualties Evacuation and Training missions. 

The NH90 TTH is the most modern helicopter of its class available on the market. It features a high level of system integration built around a dual bus Core Avionic System, full glass cockpit with Multifunction Displays, Fly-by-wire controls with 4-axis Automatic Flight Control System. The dedicated Mission System includes among others: Piloting Forward Looking Infrared system, Helmet Mounted Sight and Display, Electronic Warfare System, Tactical Control and Tactical Communication System, Weather Radar, Digital Map Generator and an on-board Monitoring and Diagnostic System. It features a fully composite crashworthy fuselage fitted with a rear ramp which allows the transport of a light tactical vehicle. The two Rolls-Royce/Turbomeca RTM322 modern engines provide power reserve in all environments. The NH90 helicopter has provision for a number of role equipment to enable mission flexibility and effectiveness coupled with a high level of safety and survivability. 

The twin-engine, medium-size NH90 helicopter program is managed by the consortium NHIndustries, the Company owned by AgustaWestland (32%), Eurocopter (62.5%), and Stork Fokker (5.5%).The NH90 helicopter programme is the largest ever launched in Europe, with firm orders now reaching 529 units for 19 Armed Forces of 14 Nations: France, Germany, Italy, The Netherlands, Portugal, Finland, Norway, Sweden, Greece, Oman, Australia, New-Zealand, Spain and Belgium. 

Read more athttp://www.defpro.com/

Thursday, September 20, 2012

Airbus and Denel Sign Renegotiated A400M Contract



Airbus and Denel Aerostructures have described as ‘win win’ their renegotiated contract covering the production of A400M components. The new agreement makes parts production economically viable for Denel and ensures Airbus that it remains a reliable supplier.

The contract was signed during a ceremony at Denel Aerostructures’ (DAe’s) facility at Kempton Park yesterday. It was attended by dignitaries that included Denel Group CEO Riaaz Saloojee, Public Enterprises Minister Malusi Gigaba and representatives from Airbus.

Ismail Dockrat, CEO of Denel Aerostructures, said the company was celebrating the conclusion of the renegotiated contract regarding the production of the wing to fuselage fairing (WFF) and top shell for the A400M military airlifter. “This successful outcome secure Denel Aerostructures’ future going forward,” he said.

Maggie Bergsma, head of Airbus media relations, said that the original 2005 contract with Denel Aerostructures was for 18 years but the new contract covers a 30 year period. Dockrat said the scope of the technical content has stayed the same but the pricing structure, terms and conditions and production schedule have changed in the renegotiated contract. Before, Denel Aerostructures was making a loss producing parts and both Denel and Airbus underestimated the effort involved in building A400M components. “We’re very happy that we’ve reached this new agreement, which is a win win situation for both of us,” Bergsma said.

Denel Aerostructures has had a rocky road, with years of consecutive losses. A ‘painful’ restructuring process began in 2009 saw some staff being cut in order to reduce losses. The company now expects to break even in 2016 or 2017. The confidence Airbus has shown in the company is a major boos to it getting further contracts.

Zoli Kunene, chair of Denel’s board, said that DAe’s successful track record on A400M production means the company has the capacity to work with global industry. “We believe there is great scope for growing the local aerospace industry.” Kunene said Denel was proud to be part of the A400M global supply chain and thanked the company for the confidence it has displayed in Denel Aerostructures. “We are looking forward to a strong and constructive relationship with Airbus for the duration of this programme.”

Antonio Rodriguez Barberán, Airbus Military Senior VP Commercial, said that, “I’m sure the agreement we are signing today is going to move us forward for the next thirty years.” Barberán said what Airbus liked most about Denel was its highly skilled workforce.

Dockrat said that his company would deliver eight A400M shipsets this year, 16 next year and 24 the year after that – in fact, Denel Aerostructures is delivering components ahead of schedule. The company is also tendering for other Airbus work and is close to concluding a contract to produce ribs and spars for the vertical tails of the A400M.

Dockrat noted that despite the global economic downturn, there remained strong demand for civil and military aircraft. He said that the company was engaging with other manufacturers about work, including Boeing, Bombardier and Embraer. “We are talking to a lot of companies out there,” he said.

“This announcement sends a strong signal: we are can take on more work. We are ready for business. We have the capacity.” 


----
By Guy Martin, defenceWEB reporter

(Courtesy by defenceWeb; First published at http://goo.gl/UOU2s)

Eurocopter to Supply Four EC725 SAR Helicopters to the Royal Thai Air Force


(Photo: Eurocopter)

Marignane | A contract was signed today between Eurocopter and the Royal Thai Air Force for the supply of four EC725 helicopters, configured for search and rescue missions. 

Signing the new agreement today were Air Marshal Paiboon Singhamat of the Royal Thai Air Force, and Olivier Lambert, Eurocopter’s Senior Vice President for Sales and Customer Relations. 

“This latest endorsement underscores the role of our EC725/EC225 family as the helicopters of reference in Asia for search & rescue,” Lambert said. “It also marks a new step in Eurocopter’s expansion of its ties with Thailand as the country moves ahead with modernization programs for its helicopter fleets.” 

Deliveries of the EC725, the twin-engine tactical rotorcraft from Eurocopter's successful Cougar family, will be in 2015. 

“This contract for the EC725 will greatly enhance the capabilities of the Royal Thai Air Force, giving us added reach and effectiveness in search and rescue missions," stated Air Marshal Paiboon Singhamat, Chairman of the Purchasing Committee. 

The twin-engine EC725/EC225 rotary-wing aircraft family features high-performance navigation and mission systems, including a unique digital four-axis autopilot. Offering excellent flight autonomy, this powerful machine is also great for tactical transport as it has a large cabin with seating for 25 persons. As a result, the EC725 military version and its EC225 civilian/parapublic variant have become the reference for civil and military search and rescue, off-shore and passenger transport missions around the world. 

Eurocopter already is a helicopter supplier in Thailand for military and law enforcement, having been selected for acquisitions by the Royal Thai Army and Royal Thai Police. 

Read more at: http://www.defpro.com/

Indonesia Takes Delivery of First Two Airbus Military C295 Aircraft


Indonesian CN295 delivery ceremony on Sept. 19, 2012. (Photo: Airbus Military)

Indonesia has taken delivery of two Airbus Military C295 transport aircraft ordered in February this year. The aircraft are the first of nine to be delivered to the Indonesian Ministry of Defence under the terms of a contract signed by Airbus Military and PT Dirgantara Indonesia (PT DI). 

The delivery took place in the Airbus Military San Pablo site in Seville, where the C295 final assembly line is located, at a ceremony attended by the Indonesian Vice Minister of Defence, Lt. Gen. (ret) Sjafrie Sjamsoeddin, and Airbus Military Vice President Head of Programmes Light & Medium and Derivatives, Rafael Tentor. 

The aircraft will be operated by the Indonesian Air Force and known in service as the CN295. It will perform a wide variety of roles including military, logistical, humanitarian and medical evacuation missions throughout the huge territory of Indonesia, which includes around 17,000 islands. The delivery of the ninth and last aircraft ordered is scheduled for summer 2014. 

Rafael Tentor said: “The delivery of these aircraft is an important step in Airbus Military´s collaboration with the Indonesian aerospace industry and we greatly look forward to increasing our level of co-operation in the years ahead.” 

To date, Airbus Military has sold 114 C295s. After the entry in service of these aircraft there will be 88 C295s in operation in 15 countries all over the world. 

The attached photograph shows the delivery ceremony held in Seville. 

THE C295 

The new generation C295 is the ideal aircraft for defence and civic mission to the benefit of society, such as humanitarian actions, maritime patrol, and environmental surveillance missions, amongst others. Thanks to its robustness and reliability, and with simple systems, this medium sized tactical airlifter provides wide versatility and flexibility, necessary for personnel, troop and bulky/palletized cargo transportation, casualty evacuation, communication and logistic duties or certified air-dropping capabilities. Its mix of dual technology civil/military equipment ensure success on demanding tactical mission, growth potential for future equipment as well as compatibility with the latest civil airspace environment. The C295 is part of Airbus Military’s family of light and medium airlifters which also include the smaller C212 and CN235 platforms. 

Company or Organisation Contact:
Jaime Pérez-Guerra 
+34 915 85 77 89
Mobile: +34 669 67 75 78
Email: Media.relations@military.airbus.com

Maggie Bergsma 
+34 915 85 76 07
Mobile: +34 615 02 31 04
Email: Maggie.bergsma@military.airbus.com

Sunday, September 16, 2012

Questions Abound as China Unveils Another Stealth Jet


    Article from 
http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/

Shenyang J-21. Photo: via China Defense Blog
Shenyang J-21. Photo: via China Defense Blog


Twenty-one months after China’s Chengdu aerospace firm unveiled its J-20 jet fighter prototype — Beijing’s first stealth warplane — the rival Shenyang company has revealed what appears to be a competing, radar-evading plane. Over the weekend photos of increasing resolution leaked onlinedepicting a previously unknown, black-painted warplane with the distinctive qualities of a stealth design.
So China now possesses two potentially combat-capable stealth jets. But — and we can’t emphasize this enough — it’s not at all certain that either will make it through development, testing and full-scale production and into front-line service. Just ask the U.S. Air Force, which since the 1980s has overseen creation of no fewer than four different stealth fighter prototypes but so far has only managed to equip just six war-ready squadrons with fewer than 200 operational jets. And that at an extremely high price: up to $700 million per plane, depending on how you count.
The J-21 that appeared this weekend is outwardly similar to the nearly two-year-old J-20. Both have two engines, two tails, big trapezoidal wings and the sharp, faceted features of a radar-evading plane. In that sense the J-21 and the J-20 evoke America’s first batch of stealth prototypes, the twin-tail, twin-engine Lockheed YF-22 and Northrop YF-23.
Those two planes flew head-to-head in 1991, vying for an Air Force construction contract. The YF-22 won and, 14 years, a major redesign and some $70-billion later, entered service as the F-22 Raptor. Ten years later the Pentagon ran a second competition pitting the Boeing X-32 versus Lockheed’s X-35 — both single-engine stealth designs. Again, Lockheed won, and is today developing the F-35 into a combat-ready warplane, though painfully slowly.
It’s unclear whether Beijing intends to compete the J-20 against the J-21 for a single acquisition program. It’s equally possible both jets are meant for production. It’s also conceivable that neither is — that they’re both strictly test vehicles. “Feng,” an analyst writing for Information Dissemination, believes Beijing can only afford to manufacture one of the new planes and will be forced to choose. But that’s conjecture. As with any Chinese weapons initiative, among outsiders there are more questions than answers.
For example, just how stealthy is the J-21 — and for that matter, the slightly older J-20? Both share the general shape of the U.S. F-22. But American stealth design relies on more than shape. Special radar-absorbing materials, sophisticated heat-absorption systems, “silent” electronic gear plus extreme high speed and altitude performance all combine to give the F-22 its so-far unique ability to evade enemy defenses. It’s hard to say whether China has mastered, or even attempted, those techniques.
Moreover, if the airplane revealed this weekend is the new J-21, then what exactly is the partially-disassembled, shrink-wrapped airplane photographed being trucked through Chinese cities back in June? When that plane first appeared, some observers thought it was the J-21 being shipped in pieces to an airfield for assembly and testing. But the differences between it and Shenyang’s new prototype are too big and numerous for the two to be directly related. Whatever the June jet is, it remains mostly unseen and, to outsiders, entirely unknown.
In other words, China has just pulled the cover off its second type of stealth fighter. But it may already have a third in the works. And it’s even possible one or more of them will eventually evolve into a useful front-line warplane.

Saturday, September 15, 2012

EADS and BAE: A Giant in the Making

A BAE Systems Eurofighter Typhoon jet under construction at the Military Air Solutions facility in Warton, Lancashire.
A BAE Systems Eurofighter Typhoon jet under construction at the Military Air Solutions facility in Warton, Lancashire
Photograph by Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg News


Europe has tried for more than a decade to build a defense business to rival Boeing (BA) and other U.S. aerospace giants. Now that goal could be within reach. The European Aeronautics Space & Defence Co. (EAD), the parent of Airbus, is in advanced talks about a possible merger with British defense group BAE Systems (BA/).
BAE and EADS confirmed the discussions in a statement Sept. 11 after the talks were initially reported by Bloomberg News. They said the merged group would be owned 60 percent by EADS and 40 percent by BAE. The two companies would remain separately listed, however, and some BAE holdings would be “ringfenced” to protect existing defense contracts.
Such a deal looks like a win for both companies. It would help EADS to limit its exposure to the highly cyclical civilian aircraft business, which accounts for the lion’s share of its sales and profit. BAE, for its part, faces declining defense spending in Britain and the U.S., its key markets. “It looks like a very interesting proposition for both [companies'] sets of shareholders,” says Zafar Khan, an aerospace analyst with Société Générale in London. BAE shares jumped more than 7.7 percent on the news, while EADS shares fluctuated but were mostly down.
EADS, whose ownership is mainly Franco-German, has tried since the company was created in 2000 to build up its defense business, particularly in the U.S. But it has faced repeated setbacks, including the loss to Boeing of a $35 billion Air Force refueling tanker deal.
BAE, by contrast, relies almost entirely on defense contracting and books 43 percent of sales in the U.S., more than the 29 percent it gets from its home market. But that has put the company at risk, as U.S. defense budgets are expected to shrink over the next decade, Khan says.
BAE and EADS already cooperate on the Eurofighter jet, and BAE previously owned a stake in Airbus that it sold in a move to concentrate on its defense business. EADS annual sales are $70 billion; BAE’s are $28 billion.
Matlack is a Paris correspondent for Bloomberg Businessweek.

Potential Hawk Order to Expand BAE Systems’ India Footprint


An Indian Air Force Hawk trainer aircraft. (Photo: BAE Systems)

BAE Systems received a Request for Proposal (RFP) from Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) for a potential order to supply products and services for the manufacture of 20 Hawk Advanced Jet Trainer (AJT) aircraft. 

The aircraft, to be built by HAL in Bengaluru, will fulfill the Indian Air Force’s requirement for its prestigious aerobatic team. 

Upon successful conclusion, this would be the third contract placed on us for the supply of materials and equipment for the Hawk Mk132, building upon previous orders of 66 aircraft in 2004, comprising supply of 24 Hawk aircrafts in fly-away condition and 42 aircraft built under license by HAL, and a further 57 aircraft in 2010. Under these contracts, we have worked closely with the Indian MOD and HAL to establish a production line in India where the aircraft are now assembled. Hawk trainers already in service with the Indian Air Force are performing well. 

Guy Griffiths, Group MD, International, said, “This is a tremendous opportunity to build on the success of Hawk in India and demonstrates the progress we are making in capturing significant opportunities to address the defence modernization requirements of the Indian Government. Together with HAL, we look forward to giving the Indian Air Force’s display team a fantastic aircraft.” 

Together with HAL we are committed to strengthen our relationship through ongoing discussions on exploring long-term sustainable business opportunities, globally. 

The potential addition to the Indian fleet, one of the largest fleets of Hawk anywhere in the world, would take the number of Hawk aircraft ordered worldwide to over 1,000. The Hawk aircraft has been widely exported. Customers include Australia, Canada, South Africa, Bahrain, India, the Royal Saudi Air Force and the UK Royal Air Force. The UK Royal Air Force aerobatics team Red Arrows has used the BAE Systems Hawk since 1979.

Read more at:http://www.defpro.com/ 

Friday, September 14, 2012

When Things Go Bad


By Scott Stewart
Over the past several weeks, we have discussed a number of different situations that can present a common problem to people caught up in them. First, we discussed how domestic terrorism remains a persistent threat in the United States, and that despite improvements in security measures since 2001, soft targets still remain vulnerable to attack by terrorist actors driven by a variety of motivations. Due to the devolution of the jihadist threat toward the grassroots, there is also a growing trend of jihadist actors using armed assaults instead of bombing attacks. We also discussed the continuing problem of workplace violence, and finally, we discussed last week evacuation plans for expatriates due to natural disaster, civil unrest or war.
People caught in any of these situations could find themselves either confronted by an armed assailant or actually coming under fire in an active shooter scenario. Of course, there are other situations where people can find themselves confronted by armed assailants, from street muggings and carjackings to bank robberies. Because of this, we thought it might be useful to our readers to discuss such situations and how to react when caught in one.

Mindset

Perhaps the most important factor affecting a person's reaction to a life-threatening incident is their mindset going into the situation. As we have previously noted when discussing situational awareness, the way the brain is wired makes it very difficult for a person to go from a state of being "tuned out" and completely unaware of what is going on around them to a state of high alert. When confronted by such a jump, it is not uncommon for people to freeze, go into shock and become totally unable to respond to the situation confronting them. This type of panic-induced paralysis can be extremely deadly, and at that point the only hope of surviving an incident is sheer luck or divine providence. People in such a state can do nothing to save themselves.
Another factor of this mindset is the need for people to recognize that there are bad people in the world who want to hurt innocent people, and that they could be potential targets. This means that people must not only practice situational awareness but also trust their gut when they feel something isn't quite right. Denial can be a very dangerous thing when it overrides or rationalizes away gut feelings of danger. Over my former careers as a special agent and corporate security officer, I have interviewed numerous people who allowed denial to override suspicious indicators they noted, and who then proceeded to do things that resulted in their victimization -- all because they had the mindset that they could not possibly become victims. These situations ranged from a mugging victim, who thought there was something odd about the way three guys on the corner looked at her, to the kidnapping victim who spotted the deployed abduction team but proceeded into the attack zone anyway because he thought the team would target someone with more money than his family had. In shooting situations, I have spoken with victims who did not realize that shots were actually being fired and instead dismissed them as pranks or fireworks. I have seen media reports of similar remarks from witnesses regarding recent shooting incidents, such as the July 20 shooting at a movie theater in Aurora, Colorado. In short, denial is deadly.
By practicing the proper level of situational awareness and understanding the possibility of being targeted, a person will be mentally prepared to realize that an attack is happening -- something we call attack recognition. The earlier a target recognizes the attack, the better. In the kidnapping case noted above, the victim recognized the attack before it was sprung, and could have avoided a long (and costly) hostage ordeal, had he taken immediate action to avoid the attack site. As we have mentioned repeatedly, criminal and terrorist attacks do not appear out of a vacuum. Instead, they are part of a planning process that can be recognized if one is looking for it. We have also noted over the years that criminals and terrorists tend to be very bad at camouflaging their actions, and their suspicious demeanors often leave them vulnerable to early detection.
Admittedly, there is the slight danger of embarrassment in the aftermath of a false reaction. I have blushed after hitting the ground and rolling to cover in response to unexpected celebratory gunfire in Yemen, but in general it is far better to initially overreact when there is no threat than it is to underreact in a truly dangerous situation.
But even if one cannot avoid an attack, recognizing danger immediately and then quickly taking action to avoid it can often mean the difference between survival and death.

Run, Hide, Fight

Some people have been critical of the simplicity of the "Run, Hide, Fight" public service video available on YouTube, which was produced by the City of Houston and funded by the Department of Homeland Security. In our assessment, the video does a good job achieving its goal of raising awareness of active shooter situations and of providing a simple, easy-to-remember mantra similar to the "stop, drop and roll" fire-prevention slogan. The video also discusses the necessity of having an evacuation plan and being aware of surroundings. Is the video a complete self-defense course? Clearly not, but it does meet its limited objectives.
Once a person has recognized that an attack is taking place, a critical step must be taken before they can decide to run, hide or fight -- they must determine where the gunfire (or threat) is coming from. Without doing so, the victim could run blindly from a position of relative safety into danger. We certainly encourage anyone under attack to get out of the attack site and run away from danger, but you must first ascertain that you are in the attack site before taking action. Many times, the source of the threat will be evident and will not take much time to locate. But sometimes, depending on the location -- whether in a building or out on the street -- the sounds of gunfire can echo and it may take a few seconds to determine the direction it is coming from. In such a scenario, it is prudent to quickly take cover until the direction of the threat can be located. In some instances, there may even be more than one gunman, which can complicate escape plans.
Fortunately, most attackers engaging in active shooter scenarios are not well-trained. They tend to be poor marksmen who lack tactical experience with their weapons. For example, in his attack on a Los Angeles Jewish community center daycare Aug. 10, 1999, Buford Furrow fired 70 shots from an Uzi-style submachine gun but only wounded five people. The Uzi is an effective and highly accurate weapon at short distances, meaning the only reason Furrow did so little damage was his poor marksmanship. During the July 20 shooting in Aurora, James Holmes only managed to kill 12 people -- despite achieving almost total tactical surprise in a fully packed theater -- due to a combination of poor marksmanship and his inability to clear a malfunction from his rifle.
This typical lack of marksmanship implies that most people killed in active shooter situations are shot at very close range. There are some obvious exceptions, like the shooting at the University of Texas on Aug. 1, 1966, when ex-Marine Charles Whitman shot several people from the top of a tower on the college campus. But even then, most of Whitman's victims were shot early on in his attack, and his ability to successfully engage targets declined rapidly as victims realized where the shots were coming from and either moved away from the threat or took cover and waited for the authorities to respond.

MDACC

As seen in the Whitman case, potential victims can do several things to reduce their chances of being shot, even with a trained shooter. We use an old acronym to describe these steps: MDACC, which stands for motion, distance, angle, cover and concealment.
First, it is much harder to shoot a moving target than a stationary one, especially if that target is moving at a distance. Most tactical shootings happen at distances of less than 7 meters. Indeed, there are very few people who can consistently hit a stationary target beyond 25 meters with a pistol, much less a moving target. Most people can put 25 meters between them and an attacker in just a few seconds, so motion and distance are your friends.
The angle between the target and the shooter is also important, because shooting a target running away in a straight line is easier than shooting a target running away at an angle, since the second scenario would require the shooter to swing the barrel of the weapon and lead the target. Both require a good deal of practice, even with a rifle or shotgun. If the target can run at an angle behind objects like trees, cars, office furniture or walls that obstruct the shooter's view of the target (concealment) or stop bullets (cover), that is even more effective.
Whether running or trying to hide, it is important to distinguish between concealment and cover. Items that provide concealment will hide you from the shooter's eye but will not protect you from bullets. A bush or tree leaves may provide concealment, but only a substantial tree trunk will provide cover. A typical office drywall-construction interior wall will provide concealment but not cover. This means that if a person is forced to hide inside an office or classroom, they might be able to lock the door but the shooter will in all likelihood still be able to fire through the walls and the door, should they choose to do so. Still, if the shooter cannot see his or her target, they will be firing by chance rather than intentionally aiming.
In any case, those hiding inside a room should attempt to find some sort of additional cover, like a filing cabinet or heavy desk. It is always better to find cover than concealment, but even partial cover -- something that will only deflect or fragment the projectiles -- is better than no cover at all.

The Inner Warrior

Mindset also becomes critical when a person is wounded. In active shooter situations it is not unusual for many more people to be wounded than killed; this also relates to the issue of poor marksmanship discussed above. In such a situation, it is extremely important for the wounded person to understand that, unlike what is portrayed in the movies, most wounds are not immediately fatal and rarely immobilize the victim right away. However, it is not uncommon for people to drop to the ground when they are shot and freeze in panic or go into shock. This gives the shooter an opportunity to approach them for a point-blank coup de grace.
It is very important for people to realize that most gunshots are survivable and that, even after being wounded, their bodies can continue to function to get them away from the attack site and to safety. Certainly, once a target gets out of the immediate danger zone they will want to seek first aid or treat themselves with improvised pressure bandages to stop the bleeding and avoid going into shock. Modern trauma medicine is very good, and as seen in the Aurora shooting, most victims wounded in these types of attacks will survive if they get prompt medical assistance.
It is no mistake that training regimens for special operations forces soldiers and serious athletes place so much emphasis on the mental aspect of combat and sports -- that is, learning that your body can keep functioning and continue to do amazing things, even after your mind has told you that it is time to quit. That same sense of drive and determination, the inner warrior, can help keep a person's body functioning after they have been wounded. The inner warrior is also critical when it is time to fight rather than to run or hide, but that is a topic for another time.
When Things Go Bad is republished with permission of Stratfor.

Read more: When Things Go Bad | Stratfor 


Read more: When Things Go Bad | Stratfor